Reading digital comics: a survey

padminiraymurray:

Hello world—

I’m writing a paper (and latterly an article) on webcomics, comics apps and how the comic reading ecosystem is changing. What ramifications does such convergence hold for the way we read, create and buy comics? The abstract for the paper this research will be used for is below—please feel free to contact me at padmini.raymurray@stir.ac.uk if you have any further questions. The survey can be found here.

Thanks very much for your time!

Webcomics vs. the World: Scott Pilgrim and the future of comics publishing

My paper will focus on how the internet has created an environment that fosters new ways to package and present text, and will examine the phenomenon of the webcomic and comic apps. I will address how webcomic creators are challenging the role of producer-publishers by directly accessing fanbases online and are consequently moving closer to a model where readers and consumers can be considered their patrons, and have increasing influence on what is being produced, thus changing the nature of the market radically. This encounter between traditional print comics and an emerging virtual comic culture challenges creators and producers to find ways in which to exploit this medium and is reshaping how producers, readers and consumers relate to comics, image and text. This paper will demonstrate the impact these alternative channels of self-publishing has had an on major publishing houses and the role of the producer.

Sequential art and comic books have been profoundly influenced and transformed by, to use Scott McCloud’s term, the “infinite canvas” that digital spaces allow, as well as by a flourishing download culture. The commercial forces to reckon with in the comic book industry such as Marvel and DC, whose stable of superheroes have given rise to numerous film versions and merchandising are now being challenged by a surge in independent comics publishing, both in virtual and print media. There appears to be a renaissance in comic book culture due the increasing commercial acceptance of the graphic novel as part of contemporary literary culture, as well as the role of the internet in growing new audiences. A recent success story has been Bryan Lee O Malley’s comic book series, Scott Pilgrim that despite its modest independently-published beginnings, was bought by Fourth Estate and then made into a major motion picture in 2010. The books themselves, while never having been published online themselves, drew on an aesthetic inspired by webcomics, which are comics that are originally first published online. O Malley’s paratextual material in the comics, for example, echoes the modes that webcomic creators often deploy to allow readers insights into their creative process, through blogs and personal websites.  I am using O Malley’s work as an example of how webcomic and comic creators have been more nimble than others in the publishing industry in creating a seamless continuum between their print and online worlds, and how this might be possible by investigating their pro-active relationship with their audiences. 

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Turkish Delight

revoltingsnacks:

Description. Turkish delight comes in two varieties: the type that may have contact with a card-carrying Turkish national at some point, and consists of a dense nougat studded with nuts and flavored with rosewater or honey; and the mass-produced powdered-sugar-donut-hole-meets-Gummi-cube type. The former is in fact a delight, suggesting luxury, seduction, warm evenings under a canopy of fruit trees.

The latter is baffling at best, and the Turkish consulate should do everything in its power to revoke the credentials of this insufficiently precious ambassador de cuisine. What need does it fill? What market does it serve? Who thought that an artificially colored gelid blob needed sugaring — with confectioner’s sugar, the substance most likely to cause an inadvertent fit of choking?

Needless to say, it is the latter that arrived at the B.A.R.F.’s loading bay, trailing a plume of sugar motes behind it into the lab…

Packaging/Branding. …thanks to the dense coating of powder that blanketed the entire rack of delight, and which the packaging failed entirely to contain. Waxed paper around the candy, nestled in a box, nestled in another box, wrapped in cellophane merely slowed the sugar’s progress throughout our facility; its presence lingered well into the afternoon in the form of ghostly fingerprints and the occasional sneeze of unknown origin.

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/home/vk/misc: SICP is Under Attack (Updated)

vedantk:

An Update

SICP will not be abandoned at Berkeley.

Although Python will be used to convey the material, I have been assured that much of the content from SICP will be preserved.

I recognize now that CS61A is a fusion of sorts: an exciting modern treatment of traditionally intellectual material….

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Technology and Inequality

theutopianblog:

By Kenneth Rogoff

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Wage inequality has surged in recent decades, but the trend could soon reverse as businesses look to replace the relatively high costs of skilled labor.

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niemanreports:

“Even the line between electronics and print will be hard to draw as we move into an era of condensed transmission of information, electrostatic printing and the all-purpose home communications console.” That was the prediction printed in the March 1968 issue of Nieman Reports in an essay by Dr. Leo Bogart of the American Newspaper Publishers Association about newspaper advertising in the year 2000.
 Some of Bogart’s prognostications seem eerily prescient, including his idea that “all the canned entertainment for a month can be compacted and transmitted in a few seconds for storage within a home recording unit, to be played back when the viewer wants it.” It’s not hard to see those ideas coming to fruition all across the media landscape today, from Netflix spinning off its DVD mailing business to Amazon’s mediacentric Kindle Fire tablet and the ubiquity of DVR boxes in the home.
 But while Bogart’s grasp of technological advances seems spot-on, he fails to fully imagine the scope of disruption that they might have on advertising revenue. He writes that “we have confidence in newspapers’ ability to adapt to the revolutionary changes which are under way today in the technology of communication … . The future of newspaper advertising is not without its uncertainties, but it is bright.”
The entire article is available as a PDF.

niemanreports:

Even the line between electronics and print will be hard to draw as we move into an era of condensed transmission of information, electrostatic printing and the all-purpose home communications console.” That was the prediction printed in the March 1968 issue of Nieman Reports in an essay by Dr. Leo Bogart of the American Newspaper Publishers Association about newspaper advertising in the year 2000.


Some of Bogart’s prognostications seem eerily prescient, including his idea that “all the canned entertainment for a month can be compacted and transmitted in a few seconds for storage within a home recording unit, to be played back when the viewer wants it.” It’s not hard to see those ideas coming to fruition all across the media landscape today, from Netflix spinning off its DVD mailing business to Amazon’s mediacentric Kindle Fire tablet and the ubiquity of DVR boxes in the home.


But while Bogart’s grasp of technological advances seems spot-on, he fails to fully imagine the scope of disruption that they might have on advertising revenue. He writes that “we have confidence in newspapers’ ability to adapt to the revolutionary changes which are under way today in the technology of communication … . The future of newspaper advertising is not without its uncertainties, but it is bright.

The entire article is available as a PDF.

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Mag for men {Valet Magazine}

stylishipadapps:

Free stylish digital magazine for men.

Enjoy!

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